Automotive

Great Tools To Keep In Your Car

A Basic Toolkit

Your need to get home is just as likely to be hindered by a flat tire as it is by a degrading situation of social unrest. With that said, we think it’s vital to have some tools in the car that you can use to do basic repairs.

At the very least, be able to change the tires, zip-tie a bumper that’s falling down, and have a non-AR mounted flashlight so you can see what you’re doing. It would be pretty awkward to explain that you had to have your child point a rifle at you so you could see into the engine bay.

A Short rifle

By far, the most effective means of self-defense you can fit in a vehicle is an AR15. Particularly, if you buy a pistol upper and make a pistol that has a brace, and a short barrel, you will have the firepower to handle nearly any threat, right under your back seat.

With a short AR, we’d also recommend adding a white light and an optic: it’s good practice to be able to see what you’re intending to shoot and, furthermore, to know that the rounds are going on target. Adding a sling is also a good idea, to make the gun easier to use.

A Handgun

For a lot of us, concealed carry has become second nature. Whether or not that’s you, deciding on how to retain access to your firearm within your vehicle is worth thinking about. For most concealed carriers today, carrying appendix is gaining in popularity in part because it makes it a lot easier to draw from a seated, driving position than many other styles of concealed carry.

For the times when you need to leave your handgun in the car, however, a locked box or small safe that’s hidden and bolted to the car makes a great deal of sense to keep your handgun from being stolen.

A Knife

I always carry a pocket knife, usually of some tactical variety or another. But, in my car, there’s always both a utility knife for work and a large multitool right where I can reach it from the driver’s seat.

While using a knife for self-defense is a messy, ugly business, any knife would be better than nothing if it came down to it. Knives are also some of the oldest and handiest tools that human beings have, and having one of them handy is likely to make most days easier.

A Seatbelt Cutter

Where I’m from, there’s a lot of water. That means that, sometimes, car accidents end up with one or more people drowning inside of their vehicles. I want to avoid that fate, and thus picked up a little window popper, seat belt combination tool a few years ago, and it sits, secured, where I can reach it at all times, with either hand.

In terms of placement on one of these, I’d recommend putting it somewhere you can reach without moving too much, and that’s secure, considering you might need to get to it after breaking something, with a concussion, upside down.

As you’ve seen here, only two of the things we recommend here are guns. This is because we’re trying to think strategically here: what are the things likely to keep you from getting where you need to go? Thus, our strategy shouldn’t be tied to any one threat, but all of the likely, possible threats you’d face to that overall goal.

Yes, physical force might well be necessary, whether it’s against a bad guy or you come into the situation in which you hit a deer and the right thing to do is to put it down. But, most of the time, the things that will stop you from getting home will be mechanical failures or car accidents. Adding a first aid kit will also be a boon to anyone.

Our thinking here is that, first, you have to define the overall strategic goals, and then suggest tactics thereafter. So, if you want to get home, we think all of these five suggestions will have you well on your way to being better prepared to do so. As always, we hope you found at least one of these recommendations useful.

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